A truly groundbreaking new novel

A man and a lost wife. Two ends fated to meet in a journey. Somewhere, somehow. The man looks for her in India and other Asian nations and he desires the end. But in his search, the meaning of hope changes.

The Wall And The Abyss was written, designed, published and marketed by the author. This is a truly 'total book' experience. You can get the ebook or a print version below:

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A man and a lost wife. Two ends fated to meet in a journey. Somewhere, somehow. The man looks for her in India and other Asian nations and he desires the end. But in his search, the meaning of hope changes.

The Wall And The Abyss was written, designed and published by me, the author. You can get the ebook or a print version below:

Print version Kindle version

Excerpt

The man raised his eyes and met her eyes. He then looked at Tony, and he submerged in the weird feelings of metaphorical hope. A hope that isn't real, but which retains its very fundamental power to keep one's soul alive during hellish nights. He gazed at the palace printed on paper. He saw no hope for his life, but his wife gave him somewhere to go. He was lost, but he knew he would be less lost walking on a road far away than crossing his home streets. He embraced his reality, and from it emanated the smoke of atemporal delusion. Fear and indifference, in a palace that stood alone in the vast waters. For a moment he thought of poetry. What poetry could heal the ashes of mortal men who have seen all tragedies? His wife gave him something, a kind of freedom, a nefarious freedom, but he was in no position to choose. At home, he was forced to walk from his apartment to work and from work to church, silent, sedated. What life to live in this repetition? His life was far away, across the valleys, across the mountains, the forests. Beyond the world's oceans. That was his freedom. His life was there, in the uncertainty, in the emptiness of ideas, but purposeful, somehow. Alive. That was a strange word to him. It sounded bizarre. It meant nothing beyond breathing, and eating. What a senseless word, one that could mean so much, but means nothing to most people. He contemplated his present life, and that life was gone. Gone forever, washed away by a wave born in deep seas where spirits gather and dance and chant to the stars. He would find his wife. That became his resolution. He would find her, because life only has meaning when the steps we take leave footprints in lands where reason tells us to avoid, but which are constantly forced onward by the heart. The farthest distances are not in marked maps, in far meridians or stray latitudes. The longest distances reside in a man's mind, when it tells him that there's a beauty unreachable out there; 'no!', that man must say, the desired beauty is out here, and it's real, and it's everywhere. It's everywhere. That distance is spiritual, and crossing it demands poetry and principles. That is the real sense of feeling alive. Life, he learned, be it sad or joyful, can only be understood on roads that lead nowhere, but which force us to release songs long lost in us.

"Does God want bad things happening to people? What about fate? Is that real? Well, I can't answer that. The real question here is: how much of them do we need to blame the world for being the world?” - Julienne (character), The Wall And The Abyss

"Do not expect children to build a new world when we keep on teaching them the same old and repetitive world. There has to be a break in our lives so we can understand the world; and maybe there has to be a break in the world so we can finally understand ourselves."

- The Man (character)

"People need the wealthy to justify their dreams and they need the poor to justify their fears."

- Alex (character)

“ ...life is, after all, balance. Balance that implies life and death. Look up to the sky again, and if by any chance you see a star that suddenly becomes too bright, or vanishes, will you cry for its death? Stars and galaxies also have to die to fulfill the balance. So tell me, if galaxies, despite their unmeasurable immensity and longevity, are meant to be born and die, who are you to proclaim the statement that death is unfair? In face of things that are infinite, death is just part of the process. Death is the balance between the visible world and the unseen.” - The Sadhu (character), The Wall And The Abyss

"I see the wonders behind everything that moves and I awake, knowing that I'm not what I see, I'm what becomes of the world after my presence."

"The problem in this world is that we have poetry but insist on living in prose."

"...Religion has us believe in a god who sits in heaven, far away, operating miracles for those who fail to see the miracle they're in. I mean, existing is already the great miracle... I don't believe in a god that endorses the premises of suffering in life and forces us to be bound by our human condition. I believe in a God that wants the opposite, a God who wants us to break free and find a new horizon, to go beyond our nature. I believe in a God who wants us to be more than fists with brains."

"Can you imagine this paradox? For there to be justice, first there has to be no being capable of contemplating injustice.”

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